Grants for Small Business

 

Whether you want to start a small business or are already an established business owner, you may be enticed with government grants.  These grants do exist, but they are often advertised online and on television as free money for all.  As previously stated, government grants do exist and many are designed for small businesses, but it is not like the late night infomercials and other products make it seem.  You do not just get free money that you can use however you like.  In the event you win grant money, there are strict rules you must follow.  Otherwise, you are at risk for losing future funding and you may be forced to repay the misused funds.

 

Since there are rules and restrictions on how government grant money can be used for small businesses, you may wonder what they are.  It all depends on the grant in question.  These grants vary significantly, depending on the organization, government sector, or private grantor offering the funding.  Continue reading on for a few sample grants listed on the Grants.gov website as of February 2009.  These grantors accept applications from a wide rage of groups, including small businesses.

 

The Center for Disease Control had a grant available to small business owners, local and state governments, Native American governments and organizations, school districts, non-profit organizations, and colleges.  This grant opportunity was titled “Identifying Neighborhood Level Protective Factors for Youth Violence.”  Honestly, non-profit organizations and local governments are likely to be the recipients of these safety grants.  However, you can still apply.  A good grant proposal and application is key, but so is need. The goal is to study youth violence.  If your small business is located in an area with a high crime rate, your business has been a victim of youth crime, or if your business offers programs to children in the community to keep them busy and out of trouble, you stand a reasonable chance.

 

The National Institute of Health had a grant available to small business owners, state and local governments, Native American organizations and governments, school districts, colleges, and non-profit organizations.  That grant was tilted “Psychosocial/Behavioral Interventions and Research in Autism Spectrum.”  Once again, non-profit organizations will likely win this grant, but no harm can come from trying.  If your small business is health focused, such as if you work with disabled children, provide counseling services, or if you provide employment to those suffering from autism, you may be a qualified applicant.

 

The Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) had a grant available for small businesses, individuals, colleges, and non-profit organizations.  That grant was titled “Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative.  The goal of this grant is to improve organic agriculture by solving current issues farmers face.  If you were a small business owner who operates an organic farm, you are at an advantage.  A part of the grant’s requirements involves on-the-farm gathering of information and more.  Since you are familiar in the field of organic food and ranching and own the property, you should be considered a qualified applicant.

 

Highlighted above were just three government grants that the United States government makes small business owners eligible to receive.  Grants, especially government grants, have a purpose.  That purpose may involve improving the economy, the community, agriculture, and safety.  If you are a small business owner who can help the government accomplish these goals, you may qualify for free funding.

 

If you would like to see additional grants available for small business owners, visit Grants.gov.  This is a well-known and trusted website, operated by the United States government.  Perform an advanced search for small business grants.  Each listing tells you about the grant, the funds available, what those funds must be used for, and the grantor’s name.